The Tapestry : live review
The Tapestry : live review

The Tapestry
The Live Lounge
Blackburn
Saturday 4th February

The Tapestry : live review
The Tapestry : live review

Singles ”˜Take Turns’ and ”˜Rode Your Luck’ are available on iTunes, on CD at Piccadilly Records or through the band on Facebook
and MySpace

Singles ”˜Take Turns’ and ”˜Rode Your Luck’ have propelled the Tapestry to an increasing level of success within Manchester, recently packing out the Night and Day. LTW caught up with the band on a snowy night in Blackburn.

Whilst ice, snow and sub zero temperatures seldom prove the ideal conditions for a band venturing out of their home town, by 9pm in Blackburn this didn’t matter one bit. The warm response of the Blackburn crowd to the Tapestry’s unique brand of guitar pop in no way reflected that days bitter onslaught of British weather. In just over a year, the Tapestry have acquired a strong and committed live following. Their vocal hometown fan base ensured that minibuses and Travelodge’s were booked well in advance.

The Tapestry deal in sharp, hooky, guitar tunes with infectious pop melodies and Beach Boys-come-Nirvana harmonies. The bond within the band is strong and visible, and this delivers an intensely tight live unit. There’s a youthful innocence and enthusiasm to frontman Liam Faherty’s vocals, his energetic, enthusiastic presence onstage has a somewhat shirking and understated appeal. Support tonight comes from local favourites Cassini Club, warming the crowd up with energetic guitar music tailor cut for the dancefloor. With 2012 seeing the reformations of the Stone Roses and the Happy Mondays, the stars seem to be aligning for Cassini Club’s dance tinged sound.

For the last eighteen months, Liam, Dyna and Katy ”“ and more recently 16 year old Reece on drums ”“ have been the Tapestry formed in Manchester after “several false-starts” and persuading mates to join the group. It isn’t easy being a new band in 2012 financially, and with guilt addled glee, the band cautiously recount funding their early days through selling a photo of children’s TV personality Dick (of Dick and Dom ”˜fame’)“pilled off his face” in a Manchester bar to a tabloid newspaper. The Tapestry are vocal in their frustration at the current state of Manchester’s music scene, “for a city with such great musical heritage it’s embarrassing”, they explain, “there’s just nothing going on”. Whilst this doesn’t seem to be affecting their success, and indeed they have managed to inspire some fantastic local artists (just look at the exceptional video and artwork for their single ”˜Take Turns’), the band do worry about the “lack of honest promoters” and deeply polarised split between the post-Oasis laddier types and the barrage of synth-wielding scenesters, leaving a pop-minded guitar group like the Tapestry somewhat separate from the rest of their hometown peers. The Tapestry could very likely prove the spearhead of a renaissance of great music from the city, along with fellow Mancunian hopefuls The Janice Graham Band and Dirty North.

Over the course of the band’s nine song set its remarkable how many very strong, catchy songs they have under their belt, including recent single ”˜Take Turns’, ”˜Tapestry’ (is it ever advisable to share a song title and band name? Ask the Monkees), the punchy, angular riffing of ”˜No Mistake’ and heavier set opener ”˜Sink or Swim’. Closing the now triumphant set is debut single ”˜Rode Your Luck’, a glam rock stomp with a sing-along chorus that ignites the best reaction of the night from the packed Blackburn crowd. Whilst the Tapestry’s approach is clearly songs-before-sounds, the engaging harmonies and dynamics add something original to what can often be a stifling formula. In terms of influences, the band explain that there “really isn’t much” that excites them in modern music, and whilst their biggest influences are the Pixies and Fleetwood Mac, this isn’t especially noticeable in their songs, more in the overall shared pop sensibilities.

The Tapestry are the kind of band that Radio 1 should look to if ever it decides to start endorsing guitar bands again; the energy of tonight’s live performance fully conveys their well honed ear for pop, and tonight more than explains the devotion they’re already inspiring from their ever growing army of fans.

Future live dates:
Friday 2nd March THE GOOD SHIP, KILBURN, LONDON
Saturday 3rd March MOTHER BAR (HOXTON CELL), SHOREDITCH, LONDON

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