Shortparis - Apple Garden

Shortparis, the Russian experimental group formed in Saint Petersburg in 2012 and long term favourites of Louder Than War have released a new video to their anti Russian-Ukraine war track – Apple Garden with the ‘Choir of Veterans F. M. Kozlova’ who fought against the Nazis in the second world war, “believing it to be the last!”. It was filmed 3 days into the war.

as one commentator wrote in the comments of the video “(it’s) about the horror of cruelty, with which we can do nothing, about terrible sorrow”.

We understand that Shortparis’ lead singer Nikolai Komiagin got arrested at a protest a couple of days ago and ended up in prison for a day.

Watch this incredibly moving video here!

 

 

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Nigel is Interviews & Features Editor at Louder Than War, freelance writer and reviewer. He has a huge passion for live music and is a strong supporter of the Manchester music scene. With a career in eCommerce, Nigel is a Digital Marketing consultant and runs his own agency, Carousel Projects specialising in SEO and PPC. He is also co-owner and Editor at M56 Media/Hale & Altrincham Life, and a Presenter & Station Manager on Louder Than War Radio.

8 COMMENTS

  1. This is a such as sad, haunting piece of music. I just wish it has English subtitles.
    This is echoing in my heart.

    • [Singer:]
      O, my sorrow
      I’ve never been here
      Where’s the end of the road?
      Who saw it?
      To whom do you belong?

      [Choir:]
      O, my sorrow
      I’ve never been here
      Where’s the end of the road?
      Who saw it?
      To whom do you belong?

      [Singer:]
      Huge country dozing off
      Evening seems unending
      Above the Kremlin’s churches
      The wind is rising, wind is waking

      [Singer+Choir:]
      Fish is looking for its’ net
      Body – looking for its’ events
      Oh, how smart the bullet became
      During the bloodsheds

      [Choir:]
      Oh, a soldier on the street
      Eating a cake, enjoying the sweet
      He’s your brother, he’s your son
      Honey is blooming in the apple orchard

      [Singer:]
      O, my sorrow
      Who’s gonna answer
      Where’s the end of the road?
      Who saw it?
      Where does the snake crawl?

      [Singer+Choir:]
      O, my sorrow
      Who’s gonna answer
      Where’s the end of the road?
      Who saw it?
      To whom do you belong?

      [Singer:]
      Motherland is dozing off
      Evening is crippled
      Above the Kremlin’s churches
      The ash is rising, ash is waking

      [Choir:]
      Oh, a soldier on the street
      Eating a cake, enjoying the sweet
      He’s your brother, he’s your son
      Blood is blooming in the apple orchard

      [Singer:]
      O, my sorrow
      Who’s gonna answer

      [The Choir Lead:]
      Where’s the end of the road?
      Who saw it?
      To whom do you belong?

      • Thanks you Ged! The lyrics are as moving as the melodies <3 I do not usually cry, but I am pretty close to that right now and I think it is a good thing.

        And whatever ones politics are I wish peace and justice to all ukrainians and russians caught up with this conflict. There is so much soul in slavic lands and it is the kind of soul that gets very close to my primordial being as a finnish person, having been influenced by a lot of eastern culture. Not to mention all the philosophy, literature and other forms of human expression people from the eastern side are famous for. Much love to you all.

  2. I read the lyrics before listening…Where is the end of the road, haunts my Heart. I am Australian. Thousands of miles separate us yet I feel there is no separation. I am moved by your courage to express feelings and ask questions. A section of my Heart remains with you. walk gently

  3. So beautiful and tragic at the same time. The tragedy of course is not that these people are putting to words what is happening, but that through these words we all can really get closer to our fellow humans who are suffering. I love russian people and I love ukrainian people and I am so very sad and broken about what is happening right now.

    Much love to everyone who reads this, especially my slavic comrades. Even though I am mostly a cynic, I still want to hold on to the utopia that through common human spirit we can overcome.

    “Each of of you is one of us.” -Oscar Romero
    “I cannot be pessimist because I am alive” – James Baldwin

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