Noel Gallagher was interviewed by the BBC last week and claimed that the working class in Britain no longer has a voice and that he finds music increasingly middle class.

Doe he have a point? at one time the UK was fast tracking working class bands from the Beatles to punk to Oasis. Pop music was the sound of the working class – the soundtrack to the youth but it has increasingly become the preserve of Coldplay and their ilk.

This could be down to the death of the music industry and the fact that only the middle class bands can afford to take the chance. It could be down to the media with Radio One still fumbling and confused like Prince Charles at a public engagement about music and not realising how much young people love guitar music and would love new bands if they could hear them. It could be down to the rest of the music media from Jools Holland to 6music sounding like the playlist from an Islington dinner party.

Whatever it is, there are now few working class  bands and voices in the media.

Noel told the BBC

“Well you only have to look at the charts, what happened at the end of the ’90s, all those bands used to be in the Top Ten, like us, Manic, Pulp, The Verve, Suede and Blur, and I think bands like that have been marginalised and side-lined,” he replied. “There’s X Factor and all that kind of thing, can you name me the last great band that came out of this country? There’s not really been any great bands in the last 10 years.”

 

Is he right? do you think it matters?

3 COMMENTS

  1. Of course it’s right, it’s happening in every walk of life. I meet people all the time that live a life of artist, photographer, musician, and when you dig a little deeper, you find out their on the payroll of privilege. Of course if you mention it, your perceived as bitter. There’s no voice left for the artists, that can’t afford the time to spend making it.

  2. New music on every important platform, and especially Radio One, is judged and allowed through by the middle classes. Most of the daytime shows on Radio One are aimed at Emily and Ben, white middle class kids at Uni. Exactly the same people who are making the decisions about the music that should be featured. They stick to their own.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here