DNAC Interview by Roisin Kelleher

420315_362518597114088_2001578111_nDNAC recently released ‘Shine On Crazy’, an energy laden track with skittering beats, a tempo-base melody and a catchiness and easy-to-listen to vibe which foresees the album well. Below we interviewed DNAC to discuss their inspirations, musical musings, and album plans.

First off, how’s it going?

I am currently working on a new album, which I would like to be able to publish in the spring, but my New Year’s resolution was to work on it until it is absolutely perfect and do not care about deadlines. So it may actually be ready in the fall…

What are the main things that inspire you musically?

These can be very weird things really, from medieval music on the harmony side to some folk beats, but many ideas simply come up when experimenting with the music technology. Quite often when playing with knobs and switches I find something I want to use because I like it and haven’t heard it before. Definitely I do not want to sound like X or Y.

How important is image to you when it comes to promoting your music?

I guess it is very important but I am worried I did not spent enough time on it. Actually I did not spent any time but I realize great music is not everything and well, I need to add it to my list for 2013!

What are your earliest musical memories?

It is probably my father playing accordion or harmonica. My worst memories are long piano lessons when I was 7 or 8, when I had much more important things to do like playing football with other kids.

What was the inspiration behind ‘Shine on Crazy’?

This is a funny one. I made the main element of this track when trying to recreate a jingle of a folk radio station that was active when I was teenager and my grandfather was often listening to. You will not be able to figure out which one was this because it changed a lot during the creative process but this is how it started.

Which bands/artists do you think are really going to take off in 2013?

Honestly, I do not know and I do not even try to guess.  Years ago a success was measured by number of singles or albums sold and the sales were driven mainly by radio, now it is the number of YouTube views. And often I cannot explain myself why some music has millions of views and some, much better one, just thousands. Anyway, as an alternative artist I do not follow the mainstream and rather listen to less known bands or artists that never take off in the conventional sense.

How do you think social media makes promoting yourself easier? Or does it make it harder?

There are two sides of this coin. In fact social media allow for less expensive promotion than any other mean so you can say it is easier. At the same time it is easier for anybody else and we end up with so many artists being promoted one way or another that there is not enough time to listen to even a fraction of them. In a way the archaic way of promoting artists that were pre-selected by big record companies was more effective but artists were dependent on the musical taste of someone at the record company. So now we experience all the benefits and drawback of music democracy!


And finally, if you could save three things from a house fire what would they be, assuming any other people inside are safe?

I would save two things: my external hard disk with all the back-ups, including finished tracks and ideas to be used later and Virus, my favourite synth that now keeps many of my own presets. Ok, there is also collection of CDs and vinyl that I would miss, so there are 3 irrecoverable things you asked for…

Find them on Facebook.

All words by Roisin Kelleher. More of Roisin’s writing on Louder Than War can be found here. Roisin is on twitter as @RoisinLKelleher

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