Skream: Skreamizm 7 – album review

Skream – Skreamizm 7 (Tempa)
CD / LP / DL
Available now 

Well known now for his chart-bothering collaborations the latest Skreamizm release still bursts with the full force of artist’s creativity.

The name Skream is no longer only known by people into dubstep. Thanks to his work with Magnetic Man, Katy B, THAT La Roux remix, and a Radio 1 show, Skream’s name and music is now known by fans of all types of music from dance to rock to pop.

However, even though his remixes and the work he has done with the previous artists mentioned has seen him fly to the top of the charts and gain mass popularity, it is on his Skreamizm releases that we see the true spirit and creativity of the man.

Like a Hollywood director who makes big budget blockbusters just to finance their pet art-house projects, Skreamizm releases are more experimental, more progressive, and (sometimes) more difficult than his other releases. Anyone who bought the limited edition Outside The Box album will know that, even though the main record was great, the bonus Skreamizm cd was where the true gold was.

On the recent Skreamizm tour, crowds have been treated to disco, house and techno sets (Skream himself has often taken to Twitter to announce what type of set he is playing on the day of the gig).

With this in mind (and the fact I really look forward to every Skreamizm release because of the aforementioned variety), I listen to this new release with an air of excitement and intrigue.

Here is what I found…

Copy Cat feat Kelis. Yes, that’s right, FEATURING KELIS. A sign of how bright Skream’s star is shining right now (and how, rightly, highly rated he is), this tune is pure minimalism where the female is in charge. Seductive and caressing, a fine opener.

Vacillate is back to what people term ‘dubstep’ but, once again, Skream twists the genre. No wobble, just industrial sheet bass of the purest form. The piano melody that drops in the middle of the track, adds beauty to the bleakness and adds heart to the machine.

Scrooges Revenge is more of a traditional dubstep and for me the most disappointing track on the EP. The quality is there and it should keep the traditionalist happy, but the track does not do nothing new for me.

Sticky on the other hand is a work of magic. Commencing with a lovely Prince-like bassline, the tune drops on a Blue Monday roll into a storming techno rhythm. This is a great track and more of what I expected from a Skreamizm. What until two minutes in for a pure bit of electro greatness. An exceptional tune.

Inhumane is one of the best titled tracks ever as it represents perfectly the music it is invoking. The track is thrash dub, metal electronics that Slayer fans would enjoy as much as your Tempa follower. Heavy shit, well heavy that is until you get to Junkyard Dispute.

This is the reason I first fell in love with dubstep. Nasty, futuristic, rolling, and just down-right moving. This is the music of the future. This track is on Rick Deckards’ iPod. The T1000 marches to this in his head. This is armageddon…

Skreamizm 7 is a perfect example of an artist developing and experimenting like they should (anyone who’s read any of my previous reviews I’m a big fan of these traits in musicians). Skream has not just knocked out more of the same.

This is not Midnight Request Line, or I Need Air. This is a musician following in the paths of previous greats. Artists who are not afraid to try new things, maybe piss a few people off in the process but in doing so gain new fans.

An exceptional EP and one to be admired. If you start disliking Skream for trying these things then maybe you should just keep listening to your ‘Now That’s What I call Generic Dubstep’ cd and leave this to the rest of us.

All words by Simon Tucker. You can read more by Simon on LTW here.


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